Rivers, Jim

Position Type: 
Faculty
Job Title: 
Assistant Professor of Wildlife Ecology
Department: 
Forest Engineering, Resources & Management
Office Location: 

214 Richardson Hall

Phone Number: 
(541) 737-6581
Education: 
B.S. (Honors), 1997, University of Massachusetts
M.S., 1999, Kansas State University
Ph.D., 2008, University of California, Santa Barbara
Research Areas: 
  • Forest, Wildlife and Landscape Ecology
Research Interests: 
  • Conservation Biology
  • Disturbance Ecology
  • Wildlife Ecology
Ecology and conservation of native pollinators; Wildlife conservation in managed forests

Advising

Graduate Major Advisor
Graduate Students: 
Selected Publications: 
  1. Rivers, J. W., J. Verschuyl, C. J. Schwarz, A. J. Kroll, and M. G. Betts. 2019. No evidence of a demographic response to experimental herbicide treatments by an early successional forest bird. Condor.
  2. Galbraith, S. M. J. H. Cane, A. R. Moldenke, and J. W. Rivers. 2019. Wild bee diversity increases with local fire severity in a fire-prone landscape. Ecosphere 10:02668.
  3. Lajoie, J. M., L. M. Gaino, and J. W. Rivers. 2019. Individual variation and seasonality drive bird feeder use during winter in a Mediterranean climate Ecology and Evolution 9:2535–2549.
  4. Rivers, J. W., S. M. Galbraith, J. H. Cane, C. B. Schultz, M. D. Ulyshen, and U. G. Kormann. 2018. A review of research needs for pollinators in managed conifer forests. Journal of Forestry 116:563–572.
  5. Rivers, J. W., C. L. Mathis, A. R. Moldenke, and M. G. Betts. 2018. Wild bee diversity is enhanced by experimental removal of timber harvest residue within intensively managed conifer forest. Global Change Biology Bioenergy 10:766–781.
  6. Hardt, B. M., D. R. Ardia, M. J. Bashaw, and J. W. Rivers. 2018. Experimental brood enlargement differentially influences corticosterone expression in sympatric, ecologically similar songbirds. Functional Ecology 32:2008–2018.
  7. Barry, A. M., J. C. Hagar, and J. W. Rivers. 2018. Use of created snags by cavity-nesting birds across 25 years. Journal of Wildlife Management 82:1376–1384.
  8. Rivers, J. W., G. N. Newberry, C. J. Schwarz, and D. R. Ardia. 2017. Success despite the stress: violet-green swallows increase glucocorticoids and maintain reproductive output following experimental increases in flight costs. Functional Ecology 31:235–244.